Readers Choice Award 2016
Contact Us | 1-800-354-5664

myPropertyAlerts and more
myLongRealty - Login or  

Log into your myLongRealty account

featuring myPropertyAlerts and more

Don't have an account?

We value your privacy.

Setup myPropertyAlerts with a myLongRealty Account

Local. Accurate. Timely.

Already have an account? Log in here.

    • No spam. Complete privacy.

Home Search
Selling Your Home
Home Values
Market Conditions
Get a Mortgage

Long Realty is pleased to bring you Household Maintenance Tips courtesy of our local Long Advantage business partners. The articles below covers an array of helpful and insightful tips for the Arizona lifestyle. We hope you find this information useful.

Arizona Lightning and Lightning Safety

July 2, 2012

Arizona has two thirds of a million cloud-to-ground flashes per year. Pima County has between 40,000 and 80,000 flashes a year. Most of our lightning occurs during July and August, between noon and sunset, and over the higher mountains and adjacent valleys. Arizona ranks in the middle of the U.S. states in terms of number of flashes per square mile. But Tucson can be considered the lightning photography capital of the world because of the clear air, high cloud bases, colorful sunsets, and scenic mountains and foregrounds that can be in an Arizona lightning picture.

In terms of safety, there are only two certain safety places, large well-constructed buildings and fully-enclosed metal-topped vehicles. A large well-constructed building where people live or work is safe because of grounded paths that conduct a lightning hit to a house, for example, and take the current safely to ground people inside as long as they are not in contact with the conducting paths of wiring and plumbing. The other safe place is inside a fully-enclosed metal-topped vehicle that also carries a strike around the people inside through the metal cage-like effect. Not safe are buildings with open sides, minimal wiring or plumbing, and/or no significant metal structural components. Small shelters to keep out of the sun or rain such as those at parks, tents, or baseball dugouts are extremely unsafe. Also completely unsafe are cloth-topped buggies, golf carts, and the like.

There have been eight fatalities from lightning in the last decade in Arizona, and ten times as many injuries requiring medical treatment; all were outside a safe building or vehicle. Lightning injuries can be extremely debilitating. There is no reliable way to become safe from lightning outside of a substantial building or fully-enclosed metal-topped vehicle. The majority of lightning victims are in their teens and twenties, and male. Pay no attention to supposed safety ideas that are based on a person’s posture, or what a person is carrying, holding, or standing on; lightning is very unpredictable and unforgiving. Plan ahead to avoid a developing storm, and go to a safe building or vehicle as soon as thunder is heard, and stay inside for up to 30 minutes after the last lightning and thunder. Again, the only certain safety from lightning is to be in a large well-constructed building or fully-enclosed vehicle before, during and after a thunderstorm, anywhere outside is not safe.

Article courtesy of Ronald L. Holle, Meteorologist, Vaisala Inc.

NOAA Warns: Lightning Kills - Play It Safe!

The information contained in these articles are provided by local area businesses. We believe this information to be accurate and reliable, but it is not guaranteed.